My 4.5-year-old daughter is fascinated by a herd of reindeer near the North Cape.

Highlights of a Norway cruise

During an eleven-day cruise with my family I discovered breathtaking fjords, island and coastal landscapes, wildlife and exciting cities and villages. Norway is probably one of the most beautiful countries in the world and belongs to the travel wish list of every globetrotter!

This blog post is available in German. / Dieser Blogpost ist auf Deutsch verfügbar.

In this blog post I share my recommendations for sightseeing and activities at each of the ports of call: Bergen, Geiranger, Tromsø, Honningsvåg (North Cape), Trondheim and Ålesund. If you are interested in the cruise experience itself, I recommend my separate report “20 Do’s and Don’ts on a Mein Schiff cruise“.

Watching football on the sundeck of our cruiseship
Watching the semi-final of the Football World Cup on the sundeck of our cruise ship while we travel through a beautiful island landscape in Northern Norway

Bergen
The best way to start your visit to Bergen, the country’s second largest city, is to take a stroll through the colourful Hanseatic district of Bryggen, a UNESCO world heritage site. In addition to shops, boutiques and craft workshops, there are also regular offices and apartments in the 62 historic trading houses in typical Norwegian timber construction, which have survived to this day. Only 150 metres from Bryggen is the valley station of the funicular to Mt. Fløyen, from where you have a fantastic panoramic view of the city, the harbour entrance and the surrounding fjords. (Buy tickets online in advance to avoid waiting times.) Fløyen is a beautiful recreational area with hiking trails, playgrounds, a small lake and a restaurant and café. Finally, don’t miss to stroll through the fish market in the heart of the city – not only because of the fresh food, but also because of the great atmosphere.

View across the Vågen harbour to the Hanseatic district of Bryggen in Bergen, Norway.
Enjoying the view across the Vågen harbour to the Hanseatic district of Bryggen together with my two daughters (Photo: Corina)

Geiranger
Norway has over a thousand fjords. The Geirangerfjord is considered one of the most spectacular of them and (together with the Nærøyfjord) is on the UNESCO world heritage list. The cruise with the ship through the fjord with its steep cliffs, snow-capped mountain peaks, wild waterfalls, scattered villages and cliffside farms is simply breathtaking. Once you arrive in the small village of Geiranger at the head of the fjord, it’s best to flee the tourist masses immediately. Instead of taking buses or taxis to the most famous viewpoints Flydalsjuvet, Dalsnibba or Ørnesvingen (eagle bend), we hiked to the Westerås Gard farm. (Without children the ascent could probably be made in one hour). In a small, neat restaurant, dishes prepared from their own produce are also served. Those who continue to climb 40 minutes up to the viewpoint Løsta will be rewarded with a spectacular view of the fjord (see picture below). The walk over the waterfall stairs at Norsk Fjordsenter in the upper part of village is also worthwhile.

View from the Løsta viewpoint 500 metres above the Geirangerfjord
View from the Løsta viewpoint 500 metres above the Geirangerfjord (Photo: unknown friendly traveller)

Tromsø
The far north is the region of the polar (or northern) lights and dog sledding excursions. Because neither had a season, but we still wanted to experience nature, we decided on the “Family Arctic Hiking Fun“. Alejandro and Astrid from Tromsø Villmarksenter went hiking with us on the small island of Håkøya near Tromsø, the northernmost university city in the world. They brought two of the more than three hundred Alaskan Huskies, which are kept by the Villmarksenter as sled dogs. We grilled sausages and marshmallows on the open fire and drank hot chocolate – an unforgettable half-day trip! (Read also my short interview “4 questions to Astrid Alberg Thomsen, outdoor guide from Tromsø“.) Back in Tromsø we visited the most famous sight of the city, the Ishavskatedralen (Arctic Cathedral) from 1965 with a magnificent, 23 meter high gstained-glass window.

Hiking on Håkøya island with guides and huskies from Tromsø Villmarksenter
Hiking on Håkøya island with guides and huskies from Tromsø Villmarksenter

Honningsvåg (North Cape)
The legendary North Cape (Nordkapp in Norwegian) is a typical “been there, done that” destination: On one hand, the entrance to the plateau rising 300 metres steeply from the sea is a rip-off (visitor centre Nordkapphallen; 275 NOK/ca. 29€ for adults; 645 NOK/ca. 68€ for a family of four) and one hardly finds a second to be photographed in front of the steel globe sculpture without other tourists stumbling into the picture. Moreover, the North Cape is not the northernmost point of continental Europe it praises itself for. On the other hand, one must have been there somehow, if one is already in the far north (closer to the North Pole than to the country’s capital Oslo!). I recommend you rent a car (Nordkapp Bilservice) and check off the visit as early as possible in the morning. Afterwards you have enough time to discover and experience the rest of the beautiful island of Magerøya. In Skarsvåg, for example, known as the northernmost fishing village in the world, we have seen reindeer grazing at close range (see cover picture at the top of this page). And we ate the local delicacy king crabs. In Kamøyvær we enjoyed the idyll of fishing boats, a small lighthouse and the salty scent of the sea (see picture below). This is how we imagined Norway!

The fishing village Kamøyvær near the North Cape
Much more rewarding than the North Cape itself: the nearby fishing hamlet Kamøyvær (Photo: Corina)

Trondheim
In the country’s third largest city, there is one sight that you really must see: Nidaros Cathedral (admission: 100 NOK/ca. 10€), the northernmost Gothic cathedral in the world – and one of the most magnificent I have ever seen. Then simply stroll through the charming town: through the courtyard of the archbishop’s palace, along the banks of the Nidelva river, up to Kristiansten fortress and above all through the former working-class districts of Møllenberg and Bakklandet (with restaurants, cafés, shops, galleries etc.). For lunch I recommend the super cozy Baklandet Skydsstation café/restaurant in picturesque Bakklandet.

Colourful wooden warehouses in front of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim
Colourful wooden warehouses in front of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim (Photo: Corina)

Ålesund
As the last stop of our cruise a real gem was waiting for us. Thanks to a catastrophe over a hundred years ago, Ålesund is now one of Norway’s most beautiful cities: almost the entire city centre was destroyed in a devastating fire in 1904. In a few years, all houses were rebuilt in the style of the time, the Art Nouveau (or Jugendstil). The unique architectural heritage of the city is documented in a listed pharmacy, the Jugendstilsenteret. Afterwards you should take a walk and admire the wonderful house facades with decorative curved lines and ornaments on the real objects. The climb up 418 steps to the viewpoint Fjellstua on the mountain Askla is also very worthwhile. The view over the city, the surrounding fjord landscape and the Sunnmøre Alps mountain range is fantastic (see picture below).

View on the Art Nouveau town Ålesund
View of the Art Nouveau town of Ålesund – on the very left: our cruise ship Mein Schiff 4 at anchor in port (Photo: Corina)

To sum up: Norway is a fantastic travel destination, which is characterized by beautiful landscapes. But also lovers of interesting cities don’t miss out. Unfortunately, a cruise leaves you almost too little time to discover the individual ports and regions in depth and to get to know the country and its people. Next time we would probably travel through Norway by train, car or motorhome.

Additional reading: 4 questions to Astrid Elberg Thomsen, outdoor guide from Tromsø

Time of travel: July 6-17, 2018
We traveled with the cruise ship Mein Schiff 4 from TUI Cruises (see blog post 20 Do’s and Don’ts on a Mein Schiff cruise)
Cover picture on top of the page: My 4.5-year-old daughter is fascinated by a herd of reindeer near the North Cape. (Photo: Corina)
We compensated the CO2 emission of our cruise and return flight via myclimate.

Read next: On a speed date with Oslo

Follow Reto’s Little Travel Blog on Facebook, Instagram or via email subscription (click on menu on top right of this page)


HÖHEPUNKTE EINER NORWEGEN-KREUZFAHRT

Während einer elftägigen Kreuzfahrt entdeckte ich zusammen mit meiner Familie atemberaubende Fjorde, Insel- und Küstenlandschaften, Wildtiere sowie spannende Städte und Dörfer. Norwegen ist wohl eines der schönsten Länder der Welt und gehört auf die Wunschliste eines jeden Reiseliebhabers!

In diesem Blogbeitrag teile ich meine Empfehlungen für Besichtigungen und Aktivitäten an jedem der angelaufenen Häfen: Bergen, Geiranger, Tromsø, Honningsvåg (Nordkap), Trondheim und Ålesund. Wer sich für das Kreuzfahrterlebnis an sich interessiert, dem empfehle ich meinen separaten Bericht “20 Do’s und Don’ts auf einer Mein Schiff Kreuzfahrt“.

Watching football on the sundeck of our cruiseship
Watching the semi-final of the Football World Cup on the sundeck of our cruise ship while we travel through a beautiful island landscape in Northern Norway

Bergen
Die Besichtigung Bergens, der zweitgrössten Stadt des Landes, beginnt man am besten mit einem Bummel durch das farbenprächtige Hanselviertel Bryggen, das zum UNESCO-Welterbe gehört. In den 62 bis heute erhaltenen ehemaligen Handelshäusern in typisch norwegischer Holzbauweise befinden sich neben Läden, Boutiquen und Ateliers auch Büros und Wohnungen. Nur 150 Meter von Bryggen entfernt befindet sich die Talstation der Standseilbahn auf den Berg Fløyen, von dem aus man eine tolle Panoramasicht auf die Stadt, die Hafeneinfahrt und die umliegenden Fjorde hat. (Die Tickets unbedingt im Voraus online kaufen, um Wartezeiten zu vermeiden.) Auf dem Fløyen liegt ein schönes Naherholungsgebiet mit Wanderwegen, Spielplätzen, einem kleinen See sowie einem Restaurant und Café. Nicht verpassen sollte man schliesslich den Gang durch den Fischmarkt im Herzen der Stadt ist – nicht nur wegen des frischen Essens, sondern auch wegen der tollen Atmosphäre.

View across the Vågen harbour to the Hanseatic district of Bryggen in Bergen, Norway.
Enjoying the view across the Vågen harbour to the Hanseatic district of Bryggen together with my two daughters. (Photo: Corina)

Geiranger
In Norwegen gibt es über eintausend Fjorde. Der Geirangerfjord gilt als einer der spektakulärsten unter ihnen und gehört (zusammen mit dem Nærøyfjord) zum UNESCO-Welterbe. Die Schifffahrt durch den Fjord mit seinen steilen Felswänden, schneebedeckten Berggipfeln, wilden Wasserfällen, vereinzelten Dörfern und Bauernhöfen an den Hängen ist schlicht atemberaubend. Einmal im kleinen Dorf Geiranger an der Spitze des Fjordes angekommen, sucht man am besten sofort das Weite vor den Touristenmassen. Anstatt mit Autobussen oder Taxis zu den bekanntesten Aussichtspunkten Flydalsjuvet, Dalsnibba oder Ørnesvingen (Adlerkurve) zu karren, sind wir zum Gehöft Westerås Gard gewandert. (Ohne Kinder wäre der Aufstieg wohl in einer Stunde zu machen). In einem kleinen schmucken Restaurant werden auch aus eigenen Produkten zubereitete Gerichte serviert. Wer noch 40 Minuten weiter zum Aussichtspunkt Løsta hochseigt, wird mit untenstehendem spektakulären Blick auf den Fjord belohnt. Lohnenswert ist auch der Gang über die Wasserfall-Treppen beim im oberen Dorfteil gelegenen Norsk Fjordsenter.

View from the Løsta viewpoint 500 metres above the Geirangerfjord
View from the Løsta viewpoint 500 metres above the Geirangerfjord (Photo: unknown friendly traveller)

Tromsø
Der hohe Norden wäre die Region der Polarlichter und Hundeschlitten-Exkursionen. Weil beides keine Saison hatte, wir aber trotzdem die Natur erleben wollten, entschieden wir uns für den “Arktischen Wanderspass für Familien“. Alejandro und Astrid von Tromsø Villmarksenter gingen mit uns auf der kleinen Insel Håkøya in der Nähe von Tromsø, der nördlichsten Universitätsstadt der Welt, wandern. Sie brachten zwei der insgesamt über dreihundert Alaskan Huskies mit, die das Villmarksenter als Schlittenhunde hält. Wir grillierten am offenen Lagerfeuer Würste und Marshmallows und tranken heisse Schokolade – ein unvergesslicher Halbtagesausflug! (Lies auch mein Kurzinterview “4 Fragen an Astrid Elberg Thomsen, Outdoor-Guide aus Tromsø“.) Zurück in Tromsø besichtigten wir noch die bekannteste Sehenswürdigkeit der Stadt, die Ishavskatedralen (Eismeerkathedrale) aus dem Jahr 1965 mit einem prächtigen, 23 Meter hohen Glasmosaikfenster.

Hiking on Håkøya island with guides and huskies from Tromsø Villmarksenter
Hiking on Håkøya island with guides and huskies from Tromsø Villmarksenter

Honningsvåg (Nordkap)
Das sagenumwobene Nordkap ist eine typische “been there, done that” Destination: Zwar ist der Eintritt zum 300 Meter steil aus dem Meer aufragenden Hochplateau eine Abzocke (Besucherzentrum Nordkapphallen; 275 NOK/ca. 29€ für Erwachsene; 645 NOK/ca. 68€ für eine Familie) und man findet kaum eine Sekunde, sich vor der stählernen Globus-Skulptur fotografieren zu lassen, ohne dass andere Touristen ins Bild stolpern. Zudem ist das Nordkap gar nicht der nördlichste Punkt Kontinentaleuropas, für den es sich anpreist. Trotzdem muss man irgendwie dort gewesen sein, wenn man schon im hohen Norden (näher am Nordpol als an der Landeshauptstadt Oslo!) ist. Ich empfehle euch, mit einem Mietwagen (Nordkapp Bilservice) die Besichtigung möglichst am frühen Morgen abzuhaken. Danach habt ihr genügend Zeit, den Rest der schönen Insel Magerøya zu entdecken und erleben. In Skarsvåg zum Beispiel, das als nördlichstes Fischerdorf der Welt bezeichnet wird, konnten wir aus nächster Nähe Rentiere beim Grasen beobachten (siehe Titelbild oben auf dieser Seite). Und wir assen die lokale Delikatesse Königskrabben. In Kamøyvær genossen wir die Idylle aus Fischerbooten, einem kleinen Leuchtturm und dem salzigen Duft des Meers (siehe Bild unten). So haben wir uns Norwegen vorgestellt!

The fishing village Kamøyvær near the North Cape
Much more rewarding than the North Cape itself: the nearby fishing hamlet Kamøyvær (Photo: Corina)

Trondheim
In der drittgrössten Stadt des Landes, gibt es eine Sehenswürdigkeit, die man gesehen haben muss: den Nidarosdom, die nördlichst gelegene gotische Kathedrale der Welt – und eine der prächtigsten, die ich bisher gesehen habe. Danach sollte einfach durch die charmante Stadt flanieren: durch den Hof des erzbischöflichen Palasts, am Ufer des Flusses Nidelva entlang, hinauf zur Festung Kristiansten und vor allem durch die ehemaligen Arbeiterviertel Møllenberg und Bakklandet (mit Restaurants, Cafés, Shops, Galerien etc.). Zum Mittagessen empfehle ich das supergemütliche Café/Restaurant Baklandet Skydsstation. im pittoresken Bakklandet-Quartier.

Colourful wooden warehouses in front of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim
Colourful wooden warehouses in front of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim (Photo: Corina)

Ålesund
Als letzte Station der Kreuzfahrt wartete noch einmal ein echtes Kleinod auf uns. Dank einer Katastrophe vor über hundert Jahren ist Ålesund heute eine der schönsten Städte Norwegens: Bei einem verheerenden Stadtbrand im Jahr 1904 wurde fast die komplette Innenstadt zerstört. In wenigen Jahren wurden sämtliche Häuser in der Bauweise der damaligen Zeit, dem Jugendstil, wieder aufgebaut. Das einzigartige architektonische Erbe der Stadt ist in einer denkmalgeschützten Apotheke dokumentiert, dem Jugendstilsenteret. Danach sollte man bei einem Spaziergang die wunderbaren Hausfassaden mit dekorativ geschwungene Linien und Ornamenten an den Echtobjekten bewundern. Sehr lohnenswert ist auch der Aufstieg über 418 Treppenstufen zum Aussichtspunkt Fjellstua auf dem Berg Askla. Der Blick über die Stadt, die sie umgebende Fjordlandschaft und in die Sunnmøre Alpen ist fantastisch (siehe Bild unten).

View on the Art Nouveau town Ålesund
View of the Art Nouveau town of Ålesund – on the very left: our cruise ship Mein Schiff 4 at anchor in port (Photo: Corina)

Zusammenfassend: Norwegen ist eine tolle Reisedestination, die sich besonders durch wunderschöne Landschaften auszeichnet. Aber auch Liebhaber interessanter Städte kommen nicht zu kurz. Leider lässt eine Kreuzfahrt einem fast zu wenig Zeit, um die einzelnen Häfen und Regionen richtig zu entdecken und Land und Leute kennen zu lernen. Ein nächstes Mal würden wir wohl mit Zug, Auto oder Wohnmobil durch Norwegen reisen.

Zusätzliche Lektüre: 4 Fragen an Astrid Elberg Thomsen, Outdoor-Guide aus Tromsø (auf Englisch)

Reisezeitpunkt: 6.-17. Juli 2018
Wir reisten mit dem Kreuzfahrtschiff Mein Schiff 4 von TUI Cruises (siehe Blogpost 20 Do’s und Don’ts auf einer Mein Schiff Kreuzfahrt).
Titelbild oben: Meine 4,5-jährige Tochter beobachtet fasziniert eine Rentierherde nahe des Nordkaps. (Foto: Corina)
Wir haben den CO2-Ausstoss der Kreuzfahrt sowie der Heimflugs via myclimate kompensiert.

Lies als nächstes: Auf ein Speeddate mit Oslo

Folge Reto’s Little Travel Blog auf Facebook, Instagram oder via E-Mail (zum Abonnieren auf Menü oben rechts auf dieser Seite klicken)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s